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How to Shoot Video That Doesn't Suck

Wedding Video Blues: 5 Tips for Better Wedding Videos

I’ve never used a video camera, however my daughter will be getting married this October and I will be filming for the VERY first time. I’m scared stiff ! ! !

Can you please advise me on the best way to capture this special moment.? I would be so very grateful to you.
Thank You,
Lucy Wilson

Wait, you’re shooting video at your daughter’s wedding?

First piece of advice:  please re-consider.

Weddings are an emotional ride for any parent-of-the-bride, and whether you wind up blubbering like a 2-year old, dancing on tables or falling-down drunk, holding a video camera will surely be a burden. It’s also not fair to your daughter.  She’ll want to remember what you were like at her wedding.  If you’re shooting, you won’t be in the video.

May I suggest passing this to a cousin? Cousins are likely to be bored enough to welcome the distraction, and it’s a great way to meet photogenic members of the opposite sex.  But I digress…

You asked for help.  Here are 5 tips for someone– anyone– shooting a wedding video:

1)  There’s a reason they call it a ritual:  Weddings follow a familiar format.  Walking guests down the aisle, the bride entering, the “I do” moment, Aunt Sally hitting the Pink Squirrels a little too hard at the reception– you’ve been there, you remember.  Many of them even hand out a shot list–er, program– to help you plan!  Rituals are, well, ritual. And that’s great for you, because it means you can…

2)  Scout Your Locations:  Since you always have some idea of what’s going to happen next, you can get there first.  If you want to shoot Grandma being helped down the aisle, pick a spot in the chapel with a great aisle view and get there when you see the organist warming up– before the ushers start ushing VIP guests to the front row.

3)  Think about Backgrounds: In the reception hall do you want to shoot facing the plain cinderblock wall or the festively decorated buffet table?  Wherever you’re standing to shoot, turn to look around.  You’ve got 360 degrees of backgrounds to choose from without moving from that spot. Choose well.

4)  Use Interviews: In 10 years you’ll want to remember the people at the wedding.  What were they thinking? How did they look way back then?  Short interviews will bring the guests to life.  No “yes or no” questions.  “How do you feel about Jenna and Sally getting married?” is great.  “Are you having fun?” is a dead end.

5) Edit Before you Post: Editing in this case just means cutting out the boring and/or horrible parts. Rambling interviews get cut to one or two great sentences.  You don’t need the WHOLE father/daughter dance.  You may want to cut anything embarrassing that has no redeeming entertainment value.  People loose enough to sing for the camera?  Perfect.  People so loose they have to be propped up to keep from falling into their entree? Not so much.

Shooting a Wedding need not be a monstrous experience (Did he really just write that? Apparently so.)

8 thoughts on “Wedding Video Blues: 5 Tips for Better Wedding Videos

  1. Love your site(and the book) Steve. I have been videoptaping weddings for about 12 years now, but I have to say after reading the book I saw an immediate improvement in my shots and my entire approach to weddings as the storybook that they are. I am zooming ALOT less and leaning into my subjects more and getting really nice cut shots that are sequentially pretty good. Also more edit in camera is happening as I am less wasteful with my shots. My last project which was about a 9 hour day, I managed to squeeze into slightly less than 3 mini dv tapes to be edited. Short is indeed better! Thanks for the great tips-
    Steve Meo- Santa Clara CA

  2. Doing interviews is a great idea, its people that make weddings special more than anything else! Just do the interviews before the guest get too drunk lol!

  3. I would definitely agree – don't try to shoot your daughter's wedding. It is far better to be involved in a more personal capacity. Rather try to hire a professional…

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